How To Make Everyone Jealous of How Awesome You Are

Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/viccastelo/2582562265/sizes/m/in/photostream/So here’s the thing – I hate running in January. Nope, it’s got nothing to do with the weather – Singapore has only one climate all-year round: Hot and sweaty. Like the title of a porn movie. And it’s not because I don’t like exercising in general.

I hate running in January because there are way Too. Many. People.

Every time January 1st  rolls around, the track I usually frequent actually looks like a porn movie: filled with panting, sweaty people doing laps.

Most of these folks got up on January 1st and decided that they would change their lives just because the earth completed another orbit around the sun.

But like clockwork, the track gets pretty damn empty by the third week of January, leaving behind the same bunch of regulars. It’s like all the people who so spiritedly decided 2 weeks ago that they were “Gonna get a six pack!!!” suddenly got together and decided to go on strike. (Oh wait, it’s illegal to go on strike in Singapore…)

Resolutions are stupid.

Lots of people got up on the first day of 2013, got hit by a bolt of inspiration, and wrote down a bunch of resolutions: Get fitter, get richer, get promoted, be a better husband… etc etc.

Don’t get me wrong, I think it’s great that people want to improve themselves. I blog all year round about living a rich life, and part of that rich life involves us being happier, healthier, and more productive.

But the sad truth is, very few people who make resolutions actually manage to keep them. That’s how gyms make money: they sell year-long gym memberships to people who make resolutions to “get fitter”, and then never actually show up after January.

Why are we so bad at keeping our resolutions?

Because resolutions are simply codewords for “wishes”. We envision this ideal, perfect person that we’d like to be, and believe that if we could only visualize it hard enough, we’d become that person. But wishes never got anyone anywhere.

Goals, not resolutions

Screw resolutions. Very few people actually benefit from them anyway.

Instead, let’s talk about something way more effective; something which I hinted at in part 1 of this series on annual reviews. Let’s talk about goals.

Okay, I know, “goals, not resolutions” sounds like some management B.S they teach you at MBA programs. But hear me out for a second here. Here’s the difference between a resolution and a goal:

Resolution: Get fitter

Goal: Run at least 2.4km every Wednesday, do at least 100 crunches on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, and swim at least 40 laps on Saturday morning from 9-11 am. Track progress on weekly basis.

See the difference? A resolution is a wish. “I wish I was fitter.”

A goal is targeted, specific, and measurable. You either ran 2.4km or you didn’t. You either did 100 crunches or you didn’t. (nope, 99.5 doesn’t count either).

Goals hold you PERSONALLY responsible if you don’t complete them.

Resolution: Find a new programming job.

Goal: Get certified in C++ programming, schedule networking meetings with employees in software companies, source for 2 recommendations, apply to 2 jobs a month

It’s true that completing your goal may still mean that you don’t find another job. But who do you think is more likely to get hired: the guy who systematically works through his job hunt and networking checklist, or the guy who sits around thinking that he “should” start sending out resumes?

Most people don’t set goals for themselves. They prefer resolutions. Resolutions are easy, and resolutions won’t hold you accountable. But sadly, resolutions won’t help you move towards a rich life either.

But goals will.

How to set some kick-ass goals for 2013

Okay, let’s figure out how to set some awesome goals for 2013. I got this idea off Chris Gulliebeau’s blogpost on annual reviews, which I highly recommend to anyone who’s serious about doing anything awesome this year. You can read about his framework here, and download his goal-setting template here.

Essentially, good goals have 3 essential characteristics

  1. They focus on a specific behavior or action, not an outcome – So “focus more at work” isn’t a goal, but “sleep at least 7 hours a day” is.
  2. They have a deadline – I usually set a specific date (usually the end of a quarter) for mine
  3. They’re measurable – great goals have metrics that you can define and review regularly to determine if you’re succeeding.

So if you’ve already made the mistake of setting up some resolutions for yourself, do yourself a favor and turn them into goals instead. You’ll be more likely to complete them.

You can follow Chris’ framework on how to set your own goals, but in a nutshell, the steps are:

1. Define a few categories to split your goals into.

My categories this year are: Cheerfulegg, Health, Personal Finance, Career, Relationships, Spirituality and Learning. Some people, like Paula from Afford Anything find that having a long list of categories may cause them to lose focus. If that’s you, then feel free to limit it to just 2-3 categories. But I’ve personally found that it’s best to set goals for all aspects of life – striving towards one area while sacrificing the others has made me miserable in the past, so I’ve learnt that balance is usually the best formula.

2. While thinking of each category, think about 3-5 measurable goals for each.

For example, some of my goals under Cheerfulegg are:

  1. Create a free mini-product for loyal readers
  2. Convert cheerfulegg.com into a self-hosted domain
  3. Write book proposal and source for publishers

 3. Come up with a set of sub-actions 

This doesn’t have to be extremely detailed. For example, under the goal of “write a book proposal” I might include “ideate, organize, write first draft, share for feedback, edit, write second draft, etc”

4. Set a deadline for the completion of the project.

This should be a specific date. If you’re not sure, pick the end of a particular month.

 5. Finally, pick a set of metrics that you can use to track your progress.

For example, I might pick something like “number of pages written” or “number of peer reviews”

Dominate Your Goals In 2013

That’s it! If you think that this sounds like a helluva lot of work, well, it is. It took me a couple of days of reflection before I could come up with a list I was happy with, but it was definitely worth the effort.

Writing everything down will give you a clarity and focus that will be crucial to completing your goals, especially in the face of temptation. And hopefully, with a bit of luck, perseverance, and hard work, you’d be dominating your goals and kicking some ass in 2013. Good luck!

Image credit: kidgrifter

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Help Me Pick My Title (And More)

So everyone I meet these days has been asking me how my book writing’s been going. So I’d just like to let everyone know right now that it’s been friggin’ awesome.

I blame peer pressure. It started out as a spur-of-the-moment declaration at an Awesome Anonymous meeting to write a small, simple ebook. It has since grown into plans for a full-fledged, analogy packed, complete guide that aims to change people’s lives (or at the very least, get their finances sorted out so they can focus on changing their own lives and the lives of others).

I’m so psyched that I’ve spent at least 3 nights a week working on the book for the past 3 months or so. I’ll blog more on my progress in the weeks/months to come, but first, I’ll need your help to help me decide on 3 things: The title, the subtitle, and the pitch.

I came up with these after going through the results from the recent survey, but I would love to hear your thoughts. Do they stand out for you and make you want to read more? Do they sound as scammy as “How to Get Rich By Becoming Wealthy Making Big Money in Real Estate”? If you saw the title in a bookstore, would you pick it up and/or buy it?

I’ve been blogging free financial advice for close to a year now, and I hope that I’ve helped you out at least a tiny bit in your personal finances. So I’d be super duper grateful if you could take 5 minutes to help me out too. 🙂

This is really important to me, so be brutally honest. Let me know if this is awesome, or if you have a totally different idea on how I should approach this. Leave a comment, or you can email me at cheerfulegg@gmail.com.

Ok, Let’s do this:

The Title

I’d like the title to be something eye-catching and different from the other sleazy investment books out there. I couldn’t really think of a better title other than the subcaption of my blog: Hatch a Rich Life. The word “hatch” is meant to speak to people who’re just starting out in their personal finances, while “rich life” is the eventual goal.

The Subtitle

I’ve got three options for the stuff that’s supposed to go with the main title. I.e:

Hatch a Rich Life: _____;________

Deciding on the subtitle might help if you take a look at the pitch first to get an idea of what the book is about (scroll down). And yes, I know that I use the word “sexy” and “awesome” a lot. I just wanted to convey that the book is targeted at an audience who’s a little cooler than crabby 50-year old men who spend all their time quibbling about “call options” and “stock warrants”. Not that I have anything against 50-year old men..

Subtitle 1. Build A Simple, Sexy, Self-Run Personal Finance System in 5 Weeks

Subtitle 2. A Personal Finance System For Young Sexy Singaporeans

Subtitle 3. A Simple, Sexy, Self-Run Personal Finance System for Young Singaporeans

Pitch

Think of this as what you’d read on the inside flap of the book. I’ll be using this to tell people what the book is about, and why it’ll be awesome for them.

Imagine waking up on a sunny Saturday morning to find that your robot slaves have been working hard for you while you slept. They’ve built up your savings account, paid off your credit card bills, saved you money in taxes, and invested your money into your early retirement portfolio, all without you lifting a finger. With your system taking care of all that boring “financey” stuff, you can now focus on taking over the world, cooking breakfast for mum and dad or… going back to sleep. Life is good.

Forget arbitrary financial advice and random stock tips. Hatch a Rich Life is a 5-week program to master your money and turn your financial life into a system – a simple, low-maintenance system that will put you way ahead of your friends on the path to a rich life.

I’ll cover the surprising truth on why most young Singaporeans are getting poorer every day. I’ll reveal exactly what you should save for and the most effective way to do it. You’ll discover the freedom of spending on the things you love without feeling guilty. You’ll learn how to dominate Wall Street professionals when it comes to investing. And finally, you’ll learn how to integrate everything into a set of autopilot systems that won’t take more than 15 minutes a year to maintain – leaving you time to focus on living an awesome, rich, life.

That’s It For Now!

Okay, that’s pretty much it for now. Again, please be brutally honest and let me know if this is something that speaks to you. Is this what you’d like to read about? Leave me a comment / email me. I’d love to hear from you 🙂