3 Lessons From A Pair of Leaky Goggles

So last week, I decided to go swimming after like a 5-year hiatus. Yeah, I blame my ever-increasing waistline.

I’m the kind of guy who needs to wear goggles – I don’t get how people can open their eyes underwater and not get blinded by all the crap that’s in there. Anyways, I couldn’t find my old pair of goggles, so I decided to pick up a pair from this ratty little store (which was inexplicably blasting Flo-Rida songs at 10 in the morning) before driving to the pool.

The goggles were cheap, somewhere to the tune of 2 bucks. I drove away from the store feeling like I got a helluva bargain.

The first thing I noticed was that the straps were ridiculously hard to adjust. Describing them as “tight” was an understatement – it would’ve taken a brain surgeon with tweezers and a microscope to undo them. Also, they were really low-quality. I would have been able to make a better goggle strap with a pair of rubber bands.

I decided to just screw it and force them onto my head, making my skull feel like it was slowly being crushed by a boa constrictor. Also, the goggles were leakier than the Titanic. By the time I’d done half a lap, there was a complete ecosystem of coral life in front of my eyes. On the bright side, I was learning how to open my eyes in water.

After about 2 laps of swimming with a constricted head and water-filled eyes, I felt dizzy so I stopped and pulled the goggles off. And then one side of the goggles just COMPLETELY FELL OFF. I couldn’t believe it – my goggles were disintegrating before my very eyes.

I had enough. I got out of the pool, threw my goggles in the bin, and went home in disgust. I’d done a grand total of 2 laps.

Three lessons I’ve learnt from this episode:

  1. Never trust any store that plays Flo-Rida songs at 10 in the morning.
  2. Cheap doesn’t necessarily mean good. Always do your research before you buy, and opt for long-lasting and high-quality even if it costs a little more. (However, some people may misread this and automatically assume that “expensive = good”. This isn’t necessarily true either especially when it comes to unit trusts, mutual funds, financial advisers and ETFs).

But really, the most important lesson would be:

3. Always strive for high-quality.

It’s often tempting for me to rush through a to-do list by doing the bare minimum for each task. But I’ve always found that it’s usually a bad idea – the work gets compromised, my boss tells me to do it again, and it becomes the equivalent of a pair of crappy rubber-band-boa-constrictor-leaky goggles.

Instead, I’ve come to approach work in a totally different manner these days by just focusing on just three important tasks a day: two tasks in the morning, a slot to answer emails after lunch, and then one last task till the end of the day.

That really helps me to zero in my focus on what’s truly important, allowing me to really kick ass to produce the highest quality work I can offer. I do this even if it takes a little longer to accomplish ’em. The downside is that I don’t get to complete a lot of my other, less important, tasks, but I’ve found that they usually take care of themselves after awhile 😉

It doesn’t just apply to work – I’m trying to approach the blog and the book in the same way too. That’s why I take a whole week to write a blog post. That’s why I’m spending hours and hours researching on nuances just to write one paragraph in the book. That’s why I have hour-long conversations with friends to test ideas out. My goal is to make it so absolutely freakin’ awesome that it would easily trump the pants off any other personal finance book out there.

So I encourage you to do the same. If you’re going to do something – a report for your boss, a product for your customers, or a gift for a friend, make it high-quality. Don’t worry if it takes a little longer – that extra hour you take to craft it will be totally worth it. Start forming the habit to NEVER settle for mediocrity.

As Faith Jegede proclaims in this awesome TED talk, “The pursuit of normality is the ultimate sacrifice of potential. The chance for greatness, for progress, and for change, dies the moment we try to be like someone else.”

Never settle for “normal”. Get out there, and create something amazing.

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Jobs and Salaries – How the Pros Negotiate

Received an amazing and detailed article on salary negotiation by Kalzumeus  today (hat tip @ramit), complete with step-by-step instructions, scripts, and the psychology behind some of these  tactics. Love it. Some gems:

On searching for jobs

“Many people think job searches go something like this:

  1. See ad for job on Monster.com
  2. Send in a resume.
  3. Get an interview.
  4. Get asked for salary requirements.
  5. Get offered your salary requirement plus 5%.
  6. Try to negotiate that offer, if you can bring yourself to.

This is an effective strategy for job searching if you enjoy alternating bouts of being unemployed, being poorly compensated, and then treated like a disposable peon.

You will have much, much better results if your job search looks something more like:

  1. (Optional but recommended) Establish a reputation in your field as someone who delivers measurable results vis-a-vis improving revenue or reducing costs.
  2. Have a hiring manager talk with you, specifically, about an opening that they want you, specifically, to fill.
  3. Talk informally (and then possibly formally) and come to the conclusion that this would be a great thing if both sides could come to a mutually fulfilling offer.
  4. Let them take a stab at what that mutually fulfilling offer would look like.
  5. Suggest ways that they could improve it such that the path is cleared for you doing that voodoo that you do so well to improve their revenue and/or reduce their costs.
  6. (Optional) Give the guy hiring you a resume to send to HR, for their records.  Nobody will read it, because resumes are an institution created to mean that no one has to read resumes.  Since no one will read it, we put it in the process where it literally doesn’t matter whether it happens or not, because if you had your job offer contingent on a document that everyone knows no one reads, that would be pretty effing stupid now wouldn’t it.”
On not offering a number before they do
“Every handbook on negotiation and every blog post will tell you not to give a number first.  This advice is almost always right.  It is so right, you have to construct crazy hypotheticals to find edge cases where it would not be right.”
“This vaguely disreputable abuse of history is what every employer asking for salary history, salary range, or desired salary is doing.  They are all using your previous anomalously low salary — a salary which did not reflect your true market worth, because you were young or inexperienced or unskilled at negotiation or working at a different firm or in another line of work entirely — to justify paying you an anomalously low salary in the future. Never give a number.”

I love this article. It’s not every day you get to read something that’s so much more than a superficial “Top 10 ways to get hired!” article. If every blogger/journalist/author got into this level of analysis, we’d have less of an info overload problem.

Why Work Doesn’t Happen At Work (and What You Can Do About It)

It’s TED Thursday again! This week’s TED Talk is one of my favorites – it’s about how we all spend the majority of time at the office, but it’s paradoxically one of the least effective places to do your work in. In the office, we’re constantly bombarded with a flurry of emails, calls, meetings, and that one annoying colleague that seems to pop by your cubicle at the WORST times ever. Which leaves me wondering: how the hell does anyone get anything done in this place?

Jason Fried offers a couple of solutions: 1. No Talk Thursday, 2. Passive Communication & 3. Canceling Meetings. While I highly respect Jason and those are cool ideas to think about (I love his description of managers – that they were put on this earth to interrupt people), I think he needs to delve a little deeper and address the crux of the problem here: that we’re all in a system that encourages you not to do effective work in the office.

Damn Reports, Meetings and Managers – not (that) evil

Most people find it hard to do actual, tangible, meaningful work at the office because they’re tied up with a stupid report or a lame meeting. No, I don’t care what you say about reports and meetings – when was the last time your customers ever told you “Hey, good job on that meeting / TPS report you did!” Yet, we have to understand that it’s part of a system, and meetings and reports are actually surprisingly necessary especially if you work in a large corporation, like I do. As a company gets larger and larger, it needs to spend more and more resources on coordination, governance, pleasing shareholders, etc. Without meetings and reports, giants we’ve grown to love like Coca-Cola, Mircosoft, IBM and Proctor & Gamble wouldn’t exist. So yes, there is a reason to this necessary evil after all.

Another hard fact of working life in a large corporation: managers. It’s not that they WANT to interrupt you from doing meaningful work, it’s because they don’t have any other choice – it’s their job. Think about it: You and I get things done by setting aside half a day and focusing our energies on a particular project. We zoom in on a problem, define which areas need to be improved, craft some possible solutions, test them out, and put them into practice. Bam! Our customers’ lives are improved. Yet, for managers, they don’t have the time to go into all that detail. Their job is to manage a dozen or more of these projects – their job is to figure out what the hell is going on with them, then delegate tasks to people like you and I. THAT’S why they hold so many damn meetings and need us to submit so many reports. They practically spend all their time attending meetings and reading reports – because that’s how they get things done. They’re not evil (well, most of them anyway), they’re just doing their job.

So what the hell can we do to get stuff done around here?

We’re not going to be able to change those facts of corporate life. Managers, meetings and reports will always be there, whether we like them or not. If you can’t stand them, go become an artist. So I don’t think Jason Fried’s recommendation of canceling meetings really addresses the crux of the issue. Neither is designating half a day per week for total silence going to help out that much. Here’s my take on what you should do to get actual work done in the office (so much to say on all these tips, but I’ll talk more about them in subsequent posts!):

1. Do one thing, with no distractions. Literally close your email client, download everything so you can work offline, and go to somewhere private like a conference room to really work on something. This is an extension of No Talk Thursday, but I think we’ve gotta extend that to become a lifestyle. I try to do some sort of variation of this on a daily basis, from a couple of hours to almost the entire day.

2. Ruthlessly reject meetings you can’t add any value to. Here’s a good guideline: Every time you get invited for a meeting, ask yourself if you’ll be actively contributing to it (ie: speaking and giving your input throughout the meeting). If not, then you’re not needed there. Reject the invitation and read the minutes instead. Meetings have two purposes, and two purposes only: conflict, and coordination (I freakin HATE meetings that are called to inform everyone about stuff). And if you’re attending, you’d better damn well be actively contributing.

3. Don’t spend too much time on reports. Literally shave it to its bare minimum. You think anyone besides you is going to read anything more than 2 pages long? Your report is a necessary, but boring, fact of life. Do it if you have to, but don’t let it stop you from doing real, meaningful work.