The Ultimate Guide on What To Do With Your Year-End Bonus

Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/muppethouse/341714428/sizes/m/in/photostream/So last week, I had surgery to remove TWO of my wisdom teeth – one on each side. Now, if you’ve ever had your wisdom teeth extracted, you’ll know that the operation is relatively painless, but the aftermath hurts like a b****. Seriously. Try stuffing 2 golf balls in your mouth and you’ll get an idea of what it’s like. Owtch.

On the bright side, it left me with a surprisingly long SEVEN-DAY medical leave from work (Though I spent the first half of it writhing in pain). Pain or no pain, a weeklong break from work is awesome. I caught up on my sleep, reorganized my room, and watched like 20 episodes of Modern Family (which is awesome btw, go watch it).

How to Handle Unexpected (Nice) Surprises

A weeklong break from work is a nice surprise, and so is the other great institution of a regular job: the year-end bonus (or “13-month bonus” as it’s commonly known in Singapore).

It feels pretty damn awesome to receive a year-end bonus, even though it’s not really a true “bonus” per se. So what are you going to do with your year-end bonus this year? Here are 5 possible options:

1. Spend it – What most consumer sheep will do. “Ooh extra money! Time to buy an iPad/massage chair/goat NOMNOMNOMNOM” (coupled with crazed look in their eyes)

2. Save it – What most people will do with the remainder after they’ve purchased said iPad/massage chair/goat. Be sure to take your shopping home in a cab – the possibility of upcoming bus fare increases might leave you with a remainder of maybe $4.70.

3. Sock it into a tax-sheltered SRS account – What very few people will do but could save you hundreds of dollars in taxes next year, depending on your tax rate.

4. Invest it – What old uncles will do (also with crazed looks in their eyes)

5. All of the above – what I think you should do.

Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nicubunuphotos/5296305774/sizes/m/in/photostream/This is what your bonus will look like if SMRT increases its bus fares

The All Of The Above Option

There’s really no reason why you should limit yourself to one or two choices with your year-end bonus. Instead, see your bonus as a way to give a boost to everything that will improve your life. Here’s how I’m allocating my year-end bonus this year:

1. Spend 10% of it on whatever I want – In true L’Oreal wisdom: “Because I’m worth it.”

2. Save 45% of it by adding it to the house downpayment fund

3. Sock 45% of it into my SRS account. Ta-dahhh: instant tax savings!

4. Invest the amount in the SRS account in a portfolio of sensible index ETFs

The great thing about this formula is that it lets me resist the temptation of overspending, meets my dual objectives of saving and investing, AND it saves me money on taxes next year to boot. Awesomesauce.

Do It Now

Most people get really ambitious when it comes to planning their time and money. We plan to use our time to get through our to-do lists, and we plan to save and invest our money.

But our plans inadvertently break down once time and money unexpectedly fall into our laps. Instead, we’ll spend our medical leave watching Modern Family, and squander our year-end bonuses on iPads which will probably become obsolete in 6-9 months.

Don’t make the same mistake as the other consumer sheep. Make a decision on the percentage of your bonus that you’re going to spend/save/invest. Then transfer the amounts to the relevant accounts immediately. If you’re reading this outside, set a reminder to do this once you get home. And if you’re home, do it now. If you put this off till later, you’ll run the risk of it disappearing mysteriously. Seriously. Do it now.

Are you done?

Okay, now you can go reward yourself with a couple of episodes of Modern Family. 😉

Why You Should Never Be Jealous

Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/brennuskrux/3356833255/sizes/m/in/photostream/Hola! So sorry for being MIA for the past couple of weeks. It’s the usual November workplace crunch, and I’ve been occupied with a ton of work including, among other things, emceeing my company’s World Marketing Conference – a glitzy 2-day event attended by senior management and hundreds of overseas sales and marketing staff. Here’s what was running through my mind right before the event started:

Emcee-ing W.M.C

I’m standing in the middle of the stage, microphone clasped in my sweaty palms, bright spotlights training on me like police searchlights on a trapped prisoner. In front of me sits a sea of hundreds of business-suited men and women, murmuring in anticipation. My CEO in the front row looks expectantly at me and frowns.

I’m nervous because I’ve never emceed a formal event before, let alone one as huge of a scale as this. Backstage, I silently pray that my scripted jokes wouldn’t be met with stony silence. One screw-up, one waver in my voice, could affect my reputation for years to come. It’s like freakin’ high school all over again.

But then again, no one knows better. Just by looking at me, no one can tell that the only emceeing experience I’ve ever had is hosting my baby cousin’s birthday party. And so I get a stunning revelation:

Just fake it.

I take a deep breath, smile my biggest smile, and start talking. The delivery goes well. My colleagues congratulate me afterwards. No one could tell I was nervous as hell. One of the big bosses slaps me on my shoulder and tells me to get ready for more emceeing gigs. I may not ever be as good as a professional, but I can totally fake a performance that’s good enough.

How Do They Afford All This?

My successful attempt at faking got me thinking about how everyone goes through life wearing masks and faking something.

Whenever I hit the clubs, I can’t help but observe the dudes sitting at the VIP tables. They’d be surrounded by other rich-looking, beautiful people, as if they just stepped out of a Like A G6 music video. Just like me, they’d probably be dressed in a casual shirt and jeans, but their shirts are $400 apiece from Armani and mine are $40 from the sale rack at Uniqlo. They’d be downing champagne by the bottle, while I’d be chilling with my bottle of Tiger Beer. Once the night is over, they’d be driving home in their Porches or Maseratis, while I’d be stumbling to find a cab (or a Night Rider bus if I’m not too tipsy).

For a brief moment, I’d think to myself: “How do they afford all this?” I’d start to wonder what they do for a living, and how awesome it must be to be them.

Wealth – The Easiest Thing To Fake

And then I remind myself that I’m simply jumping to conclusions. What if they’re faking it, just like how I was faking my prowess as an emcee? After all, wealth is the easiest thing to fake. Blow a couple of months’ salary on clothes and drinks, and anyone can look like a superstar.

The truth is, I don’t know anything about them. I don’t know if they’re prudent in their spending, or if they spend every cent they earn. I don’t know if they earn thousands of dollars in passive income, or if they lie awake worrying about how they’ll keep up their lifestyles. I don’t know if they have a rock solid portfolio, or if they’re so deeply in debt that even their enormous paychecks can’t make a dent in their credit card bills.

Redirecting the Moolah

And then I remind myself about just how much I’ve been pouring into my savings and investments, month after month, without fail. No wonder I haven’t bought a new pair of jeans in 4 years – I’ve been too busy shoveling cash into index ETFs and building up a downpayment fund so I don’t have to take on too much mortgage debt.

No wonder I can’t afford to celebrate the end of the year with five bottles of champagne, because I’d much rather set aside a few hundred dollars every month for travel, funding trips like my $3,500 West Coast vacation. It’s not that I can’t afford to spend on nice clothes and drinks, I just choose to put my money towards things that I value much more: freedom and experiences.

Lots of people fake their wealth. But without looking at their audited personal financial statements, there’s really no way to tell if they’re the real deal, or if it’s just a well-polished illusion. We simply can’t make assumptions just by looking at people.

So keep that in mind the next time you watch an emcee on stage, or catch yourself getting jealous of that well-dressed dude at the VIP table. They might just be faking it. 😉

5 Surprising Truths About Investing in Real Estate

Singaporeans are absolutely crazy about property. Whenever I walk into a bookstore, I see shelves upon shelves of real estate investing books with pictures greasy men in business suits on the cover, wearing a big smile and screaming “I Got Rich Making Big Money Investing in Real Estate, AND YOU CAN TOO!!”

I hate those books. One day, I’m going to write a book with a naked picture of me on the cover, wearing nothing but a big smile and screaming “I Published a Book With A Picture of Me In a Birthday Suit, AND YOU CAN TOO!!” And I’m going to get the bookstores to stack ‘em right next to those damn real estate books.

I get really puzzled whenever I talk to someone my age about investing, and hear that they would rather “just invest in property”. Those greasy men in business suits can’t be that convincing, can they?

I’m probably going to piss off every single real estate agent in the world by writing this, but I can think of 5 reasons why real estate isn’t the best investment for young people:

1. Your first house isn’t an investment

Most people who buy a house more expensive than they can afford justify it by claiming that it’s an “investment”. Let’s be clear here – your first house is a place to live. It is NOT an investment. Even if your house rises in value along with every other house in the country, whatever you gained from selling your house would just go right back into purchasing another place to live in.

2. Property isn’t necessarily safer than the stock market

Most people think that property is “safer” that the stock market. But really, if you’re lumping ALL your savings into one house, how diversified is your investment portfolio, really? Compare that to investing in the Straits Times Index (STI), which immediately diversifies your investment into 30 stocks, each backed by a real, physical, blue-chip company.

By the way, you can lose money in real estate. Anyone remember 2008?

3. Property may not give you a better return than stocks

An SGX-led study showed that if you invested in Singapore property in 2001 and held it until 2010, you’d be worse off than if you had simply invested that same amount in the STI. Globally, stocks may or may not outpace real estate in any given year, but stocks have historically performed better than real estate over the long-term.

A New York Times article also described how real estate in the US has only barely managed to keep up with inflation, while stocks have risen comfortably above inflation for the past 200 years. As Yale economist Robert Shiller puts it, “from 1890 through 1990, the return of real estate was just about zero after inflation.”

4. Costs will destroy a large chunk of your returns

If someone bought a house for $250,000 and sold it 5 years later for $400,000, most people would think, “Great! I made $150,000!” But they failed to account for all the associated costs that go along with it: Taxes, agent fees, commissions, insurance, maintenance, stamp duties, renovation costs, furnishing, etc, which would add hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars to your monthly bill.

Let’s not forget the interest you’ll have to pay on the housing loan you took out, which is easily in the ballpark of tens of thousands of dollars. For Singaporeans, if you use your CPF to purchase a house, you’d have to pay back the amount you “borrowed” from CPF, PLUS INTEREST (It stands at 2.6% today, but it’ll rise once interest rates go up. I totally see the rationale of this policy from the government’s perspective, but am I the only one who thinks this is a crappy deal from an investing standpoint?).

The costs I pay for investing in a low-cost ETF? A commission of $25, and an annual expense ratio of 0.3% (For every $10,000 invested, that’s like thirty bucks).

5. Mortgages screw with your psyche

“Hey, let’s use other people’s money to get rich!”… is what most people would tell themselves before taking on a huge-ass mortgage.

Dude, a mortgage isn’t something to scoff at. It’s as full-fledged and serious a commitment as… marriage. Things change once you’ve got the ever-present threat of a monthly mortgage payment hanging over your head. You start to see things differently. Mortgages cause people to become way more risk-averse, and less likely to do things like finding a better job, starting their own business, and investing, even though those options may help them to become financially better off.

Think of it as a Big Buy – Not an investment

I’m not saying that real estate is a bad investment. You can make money from it if you already have 1) a house to live in, 2) lots of spare cash, and 3) a strong portfolio and are looking to diversify your investments.

But most young people don’t fall into this category. Instead, we should see our first property as a really, really, really large purchase rather than an investment. Think of it as a great way to build equity and start a family. But please don’t delude yourself into thinking that you’re going to get rich from it. If you’re just starting out, you’d be better off focusing on building a sensible portfolio of stocks and bonds.

Agree/disagree? Leave a comment or send me an email at cheerfulegg [at] gmail [dot] com. I’d love to hear from you, especially if you’re interested in publishing my birthday suited book cover.

The Great Index Unit Trust Hoax

Whenever I check into a hotel, I get really fascinated by just how crazy expensive some of the items in the minibar are.

One time when I was on vacation, I felt a little hungry so I lumbered over to the minibar and pulled out a pack of cashew nuts – just the regular kind you’d find at any convenience store. Just to be safe, I checked the prices before I tore the pack open, and involuntarily yelled: “NINE DOLLARS FOR A PACK OF TWELVE NUTS?! ARE YOU OUT OF YOUR FRICKIN’ MIND???”

It’s absolutely crazy how people are perfectly willing to pay several times the price for the EXACT SAME PRODUCT – a product that they could have gotten much cheaper elsewhere. We see this everywhere: a Nike sneaker vs a non-branded one, Tropicana orange juice vs a house brand, and beer that costs $12 in a restaurant and $2.50 in the supermarket.

A pack of nuts from the minibar might do a little damage to your wallet, but it’s nothing compared to the damage a unit trust (also known as a mutual fund for my American friends) could do to your long-term wealth.

Costs Matter

I’m not even going to discuss actively managed unit trusts with their high management costs. Nobody takes those seriously anymore – There’s more than enough research that shows that as a whole, actively managed unit trusts are a terrible choice compared to index funds.  Check out here and here.

Today, I’ll just uncover a pricing anomaly I like to call The Great Index Unit Trust Hoax, which involves 2 unit trusts being sold to Singaporean investors. Both charge exorbitant amounts to essentially help you invest in portfolios that you could have easily put together yourself… at a fraction of the cost.

To Infinity… and Beyond!

Exhibit A is the Infinity US 500 Stock Index Fund, which is supposed to help you track the return of the S&P 500. To accomplish this, it hits you with a whopping 0.98% expense ratio.  Now 0.98% may not sound like too much of a big deal, but try compounding that over 30 years and you’re talking about a difference of tens of thousands of dollars of extra cash that’s coming out of your pocket.

But hold on – there’s another, cheaper way for you to track the return of the S&P 500 on your own. You could buy an ETF from Vanguard, which gives you the EXACT SAME RETURN, while charging a mere 0.05% expense ratio. This makes the Infinity unit trust almost 20 TIMES MORE EXPENSIVE than the Vanguard ETF. Yeah, I know.

Home Sweet Home… For 4x The Price

Okay, I hear you say, so maybe that’s a problem unique to the USA.

Oh wait, it’s not.

Presenting Exhibit B, the patriotically-named unit trust MyHome Fund run by Singaporean asset management company Nikko AM. It invests in 1) an ETF tracking the Straits Times Index and 2) the ABF Singapore Bond Index Fund ETF. They’ll charge you a ridiculous expense ratio of 1.2% for all their hard work.

But wait! Did you know that you could totally log onto your online brokerage and invest in 2 ETFs which track the EXACT SAME THING for a fraction of the cost? Namely:

1. SPDR Straits Times Index ETF (SGX Ticker: ES3) – Expense ratio: 0.30%

2. ABF Singapore Bond Index Fund ETF (SGX Ticker: A35) – Management fee + trustee fee: 0.20% (I couldn’t find an exact figure for the total expense ratio on their website – those sneaky bastards – but it shouldn’t  be too far away from the sum of these 2 fees).

Total weighted expense ratio: 0.28%

Ta-daahh! You’ve constructed the exact same product, at a quarter of the cost. And that’s not taking into account sales charges, redemption charges, front-end charges, admin charges, and hire-an-attractive-banker-to-convince-you-to-part-with-your-money charges.

Do Yourself a Favor

My point here is to always, always, read the fine print. The finance industry loves to play down details like these because it means higher commissions for them – commissions that come right out of your pocket.

If you plan on investing passively, do yourself a favor and skip out on the unit trusts. You’re way better off buying the equivalent ETFs instead. Of course, there are a few disadvantages in buying ETFs (eg brokerage commissions, currency exposure, inability to invest in small amounts), but they can be easily circumvented (eg investing regularly using no-minimum commission brokers,  or in the case of the STI ETF, setting aside an amount every month until you can afford one lot). None of the disadvantages of ETFs justifies the tens of thousands of dollars you’re giving up in expenses if you invest in unit trusts.

It would be totally awesome if a reputable fund provider like Vanguard would set up an index fund in Singapore (are you reading this, John Bogle?), which would eliminate all the disadvantages in the para above, and yet charge a reasonable expense ratio that doesn’t require us to give up our first-born child.

In the meantime, stay smart and read the fine print. Save your money for those overpriced cashew nuts from the minibar. At least they’re tasty.

3 Lessons From A Pair of Leaky Goggles

So last week, I decided to go swimming after like a 5-year hiatus. Yeah, I blame my ever-increasing waistline.

I’m the kind of guy who needs to wear goggles – I don’t get how people can open their eyes underwater and not get blinded by all the crap that’s in there. Anyways, I couldn’t find my old pair of goggles, so I decided to pick up a pair from this ratty little store (which was inexplicably blasting Flo-Rida songs at 10 in the morning) before driving to the pool.

The goggles were cheap, somewhere to the tune of 2 bucks. I drove away from the store feeling like I got a helluva bargain.

The first thing I noticed was that the straps were ridiculously hard to adjust. Describing them as “tight” was an understatement – it would’ve taken a brain surgeon with tweezers and a microscope to undo them. Also, they were really low-quality. I would have been able to make a better goggle strap with a pair of rubber bands.

I decided to just screw it and force them onto my head, making my skull feel like it was slowly being crushed by a boa constrictor. Also, the goggles were leakier than the Titanic. By the time I’d done half a lap, there was a complete ecosystem of coral life in front of my eyes. On the bright side, I was learning how to open my eyes in water.

After about 2 laps of swimming with a constricted head and water-filled eyes, I felt dizzy so I stopped and pulled the goggles off. And then one side of the goggles just COMPLETELY FELL OFF. I couldn’t believe it – my goggles were disintegrating before my very eyes.

I had enough. I got out of the pool, threw my goggles in the bin, and went home in disgust. I’d done a grand total of 2 laps.

Three lessons I’ve learnt from this episode:

  1. Never trust any store that plays Flo-Rida songs at 10 in the morning.
  2. Cheap doesn’t necessarily mean good. Always do your research before you buy, and opt for long-lasting and high-quality even if it costs a little more. (However, some people may misread this and automatically assume that “expensive = good”. This isn’t necessarily true either especially when it comes to unit trusts, mutual funds, financial advisers and ETFs).

But really, the most important lesson would be:

3. Always strive for high-quality.

It’s often tempting for me to rush through a to-do list by doing the bare minimum for each task. But I’ve always found that it’s usually a bad idea – the work gets compromised, my boss tells me to do it again, and it becomes the equivalent of a pair of crappy rubber-band-boa-constrictor-leaky goggles.

Instead, I’ve come to approach work in a totally different manner these days by just focusing on just three important tasks a day: two tasks in the morning, a slot to answer emails after lunch, and then one last task till the end of the day.

That really helps me to zero in my focus on what’s truly important, allowing me to really kick ass to produce the highest quality work I can offer. I do this even if it takes a little longer to accomplish ’em. The downside is that I don’t get to complete a lot of my other, less important, tasks, but I’ve found that they usually take care of themselves after awhile 😉

It doesn’t just apply to work – I’m trying to approach the blog and the book in the same way too. That’s why I take a whole week to write a blog post. That’s why I’m spending hours and hours researching on nuances just to write one paragraph in the book. That’s why I have hour-long conversations with friends to test ideas out. My goal is to make it so absolutely freakin’ awesome that it would easily trump the pants off any other personal finance book out there.

So I encourage you to do the same. If you’re going to do something – a report for your boss, a product for your customers, or a gift for a friend, make it high-quality. Don’t worry if it takes a little longer – that extra hour you take to craft it will be totally worth it. Start forming the habit to NEVER settle for mediocrity.

As Faith Jegede proclaims in this awesome TED talk, “The pursuit of normality is the ultimate sacrifice of potential. The chance for greatness, for progress, and for change, dies the moment we try to be like someone else.”

Never settle for “normal”. Get out there, and create something amazing.

Help Me Pick My Title (And More)

So everyone I meet these days has been asking me how my book writing’s been going. So I’d just like to let everyone know right now that it’s been friggin’ awesome.

I blame peer pressure. It started out as a spur-of-the-moment declaration at an Awesome Anonymous meeting to write a small, simple ebook. It has since grown into plans for a full-fledged, analogy packed, complete guide that aims to change people’s lives (or at the very least, get their finances sorted out so they can focus on changing their own lives and the lives of others).

I’m so psyched that I’ve spent at least 3 nights a week working on the book for the past 3 months or so. I’ll blog more on my progress in the weeks/months to come, but first, I’ll need your help to help me decide on 3 things: The title, the subtitle, and the pitch.

I came up with these after going through the results from the recent survey, but I would love to hear your thoughts. Do they stand out for you and make you want to read more? Do they sound as scammy as “How to Get Rich By Becoming Wealthy Making Big Money in Real Estate”? If you saw the title in a bookstore, would you pick it up and/or buy it?

I’ve been blogging free financial advice for close to a year now, and I hope that I’ve helped you out at least a tiny bit in your personal finances. So I’d be super duper grateful if you could take 5 minutes to help me out too. 🙂

This is really important to me, so be brutally honest. Let me know if this is awesome, or if you have a totally different idea on how I should approach this. Leave a comment, or you can email me at cheerfulegg@gmail.com.

Ok, Let’s do this:

The Title

I’d like the title to be something eye-catching and different from the other sleazy investment books out there. I couldn’t really think of a better title other than the subcaption of my blog: Hatch a Rich Life. The word “hatch” is meant to speak to people who’re just starting out in their personal finances, while “rich life” is the eventual goal.

The Subtitle

I’ve got three options for the stuff that’s supposed to go with the main title. I.e:

Hatch a Rich Life: _____;________

Deciding on the subtitle might help if you take a look at the pitch first to get an idea of what the book is about (scroll down). And yes, I know that I use the word “sexy” and “awesome” a lot. I just wanted to convey that the book is targeted at an audience who’s a little cooler than crabby 50-year old men who spend all their time quibbling about “call options” and “stock warrants”. Not that I have anything against 50-year old men..

Subtitle 1. Build A Simple, Sexy, Self-Run Personal Finance System in 5 Weeks

Subtitle 2. A Personal Finance System For Young Sexy Singaporeans

Subtitle 3. A Simple, Sexy, Self-Run Personal Finance System for Young Singaporeans

Pitch

Think of this as what you’d read on the inside flap of the book. I’ll be using this to tell people what the book is about, and why it’ll be awesome for them.

Imagine waking up on a sunny Saturday morning to find that your robot slaves have been working hard for you while you slept. They’ve built up your savings account, paid off your credit card bills, saved you money in taxes, and invested your money into your early retirement portfolio, all without you lifting a finger. With your system taking care of all that boring “financey” stuff, you can now focus on taking over the world, cooking breakfast for mum and dad or… going back to sleep. Life is good.

Forget arbitrary financial advice and random stock tips. Hatch a Rich Life is a 5-week program to master your money and turn your financial life into a system – a simple, low-maintenance system that will put you way ahead of your friends on the path to a rich life.

I’ll cover the surprising truth on why most young Singaporeans are getting poorer every day. I’ll reveal exactly what you should save for and the most effective way to do it. You’ll discover the freedom of spending on the things you love without feeling guilty. You’ll learn how to dominate Wall Street professionals when it comes to investing. And finally, you’ll learn how to integrate everything into a set of autopilot systems that won’t take more than 15 minutes a year to maintain – leaving you time to focus on living an awesome, rich, life.

That’s It For Now!

Okay, that’s pretty much it for now. Again, please be brutally honest and let me know if this is something that speaks to you. Is this what you’d like to read about? Leave me a comment / email me. I’d love to hear from you 🙂

Using Systems to Dominate Learning (And Anything Else)

The MIT Challenge

Recently read a guest post by blogger Scott Young, who stunned the world by doing the impossible. Scott completed MIT’s notoriously difficult Computer Science curriculum, which usually takes bright MIT students four years to finish, in one year. Watch the TED talk on his MIT Challenge here:

To do this, Scott adopted a carefully constructed learning system that let him compress the concepts of a 4-year education into a short span of time. This wasn’t simply a matter of cramming for exams. Scott not only passed all the exams but also completed all the programming projects, which require a deep understanding of the material. How did he do it?

First, he watched all the lectures online to get a birds-eye view of the material. By watching the video lectures at 1.5x-2x the normal speed, he managed to go through a semester’s worth of lectures in a couple of days.

Next, he spent a lot more time developing insight and drawing connections. He’d first take a piece of paper and write the concept that he was trying to understand at the top. He then wrote out his own explanation, as if he was teaching it to someone else. When he came to a gap in his knowledge, he’d go back to the textbook or find it online. In this way, he systematically filled in all the knowledge gaps until he had a deep, complete, understanding of the material.

Third, he went through practice problems with the solution key in hand. He’d check his work question-by-question, getting immediate feedback for every question he did. Compared to other students who might have to wait weeks before they got back their graded assignments, Scott’s system gave him a tight feedback loop which dramatically improved his effectiveness.

As Scott wrote in a guest post describing his journey: “…the method you use to learn matters a lot. Deeper levels of processing and spaced repetition can, in some cases, double your efficiency (emphasis mine). Indeed, the research in deliberate practice shows us that without the right method, learning can plateau forever.”

In short, Scott wasn’t studying harder; he was using a system to study smarter.

The Power Of Systems

Scott’s MIT Challenge forms the premise of the book I’m currently working on: That adopting the right systems can help you to achieve much, much more than the average individual.

You can use systems to create a desirable habit, deliver happiness to people, get fitter, be more productive, negotiate better.. pretty much anything you want to achieve in life.

Most people don’t know how to improve their own lives because they rely solely on “trying harder”. How many of us make New Years resolutions to go to the gym more often, only to fail miserably before February comes around? How many of us resolve to be more productive at work, but end up online shopping and Facebook stalking before lunchtime? And how many of us resolve to saving and investing more this year, only to have all our extra cash wiped out by a year-end vacation?

Instead of trying harder, applying systems is infinitely more effective. Here’s why:

1. Systems remove the need for “willpower”

The trouble with willpower is that it’s easy to lose steam. We burn out. John Tierney, coauthor of Willpower: Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength, describes willpower as a finite resource that runs out just as easily as a fuel in your car tank. Systems, on the other hand, take control away from you. They force you onto a certain path so that you don’t have to use willpower. It sounds counterintuitive, but we’re more likely to be successful at something when we are willing to hand over control to a system.

2. Systems are much simpler to follow 

If you’re trying to lose weight, think about the barrage of information out there on weight management. Hundreds of articles and blogs give handy “tips” and nuggets of advice, but they’re often conflicting and confusing. A system, on the other hand, is based on rules. Step 1, 2, 3. Go to a personal trainer and he’ll tell you exactly what you need to eat, how to exercise, and all that jazz. You don’t have to think – all you need to do is stick to the system, and you’ll succeed.

3. Systems are smarter

Think about Scott Young’s system for accelerated learning. It’s a simple formula, but it’ll save you a lot of time and effort when it comes to studying. Think about how much easier it is to set up a GIRO standing instruction that automatically helps you to save every month, instead of putting in time and effort to “save harder”. Finding the right system can help you to do things a lot more efficiently and effectively than most people.

Viewing the world from a systems perspective

Systems are effective, more so than many of us realize. That’s the premise of this blog, as well as the upcoming book. So far, I’ve showed you how to use systems to improve your savings and investments, find the right types of insurance, and spend more efficiently on the things you love. The book will delve a little more deeply into the psychology of saving, spending and investing, and will describe more detail on the systems that will help you tackle your personal finances.

You start to see things differently once you look at life from a systems perspective. Large challenges suddenly don’t seem so daunting anymore, and possibilities start to open up.  Are there any problems that you’re currently stumped by, but could possibly be solved by applying a system? I’d love to hear from you, even if you haven’t found a solution yet. Leave a comment, or send me an email at cheerfulegg@gmail.com.

Cheers 🙂